Thursday, January 10, 2013

As to the Question of "Why Bother?"

Perusing Jesse's Cafe Americain this morning, a blog I like reading now and again because he lives in Paris and is very smart about financial stuff and food, I read his entertaining and insightful commentary on the platinum coin "solution" (a trick known formerly as "slight of hand") being tossed around the punditry as a solution to US debt.  Then scrolled down further to find this terrific video I wanted to share with whomever out there finds themselves occasionally sighing "Why bother? It's all so pointless."  If you're too impatient to watch all of it,  (but really, would it kill you to watch to the whole thing? Surely we learn from these timeouts) skip ahead to minute 45 and listen to his response to a woman's question as to why, if the world's so utterly fecked, we should even bother choosing just and moral actions that may get us in trouble, and may not change the big picture at all – ever.  Of what value is moral behavior, are moral choices and stands, in an immoral and corrupt world? Not surprisingly, Chris Hedges, bless him,  has thought about this and has valuable insight to share, and a lovely story or two.

He reminds us most of all that "despair is the engine of totalitarianism." A sticky that belongs on every fridge.


To borrow yet another spot on quote from  Terminator 2 via John Connor, "This is deep."

Like a long, cool drink of water on a hot day.




From Jesse's today.


“If you can feel that staying human is worth while, even when it can't have any practical result whatsoever, you've beaten them.”

George Orwell

"We who lived in concentration camps can remember the men who walked through the huts comforting others, giving away their last piece of bread. They may have been few in number, but they offer sufficient proof that everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms -- to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one's own way.” 

Viktor E. Frankl


Peace out.

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